All That You See Here, Forget

Aslan Gaisumov

March 14 – April 28, 2018

Unit 4 Huntingdon Estate, Bethnal Green Rd, London E1 6JU

Installation View, Aslan Gaisumov, All That You See Here, Forget, 2018
Installation View, Aslan Gaisumov, All That You See Here, Forget, 2018
Installation View, Aslan Gaisumov, All That You See Here, Forget, 2018
Installation View, Aslan Gaisumov, All That You See Here, Forget, 2018
Installation View, Aslan Gaisumov, All That You See Here, Forget, 2018
Aslan Gaisumov, Keicheyuhea (film still), 2017, HD video, colour, sound, in Chechen with English subtitles, 22’57’’
Aslan Gaisumov, Keicheyuhea (film still), 2017, HD video, colour, sound, in Chechen with English subtitles, 22’57’’
Aslan Gaisumov, People of No Consequence (film still), 2016, HD video, colour, 8‘34“
Aslan Gaisumov, People of No Consequence (film still), 2016, HD video, colour, 8‘34“
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 For the duration of Aslan Gaisumov’s exhibition All That You See Here, Forget, please enter the exhibition space via the parking lot at the back of the building. This can be accessed via the gates on Chance Street.

 

Emalin is pleased to present All That You See Here, Forget, Aslan Gaisumov’s first exhibition at the gallery, curated by Anna Smolak. This is the artist’s first solo project in the UK and will debut a new video work, Keicheyuhea, produced with support by the Han Nefkens Foundation, Barcelona. As part of a video installation, Keicheyuhea enters into dialogue with People of No Consequence (2016), produced by M HKA Museum of Contemporary Art Antwerp.

 

All That You See Here, Forget is a reflection on the burden of memory, the need to bear witness and the challenges of communicating the unspeakable catastrophes of history. Comprising of two video works existing alongside each other on either sides of a shared screen – Keicheyuhea (2017) and People of No Consequence (2016) – Gaisumov’s presentation is set against the backdrop of February 1944: a time still largely unacknowledged in official historical accounts when, by Stalin’s decree, the entire Chechen and Ingush nations were violently exiled from their homelands and resettled in Central Asia.

 

Keicheyuhea follows the artist’s grandmother, Zayanu Khasueva, as she returns to her home village for the first time since her family’s deportation 73 years earlier. Keicheyuhea, a remote mountain settlement in the Galanchozh region of Chechnya, remained a closed territory under Soviet rule and has only recently become accessible to its former residents. In the artist’s first multi-shot video, debuting at Emalin, the voice of Zayana Khasueva accompanies the arduous journey into the mountains.

 

The single-shot video People of No Consequence documents the recent gathering of survivors of the mass expulsions. Occasioned by the artist as the first meeting of its kind, 119 of the more than 300 surviving witnesses Gaisumov met with came together in a municipal hall in Grozny.

 

 

Aslan Gaisumov (b. 1991) lives and works in Grozny, Chechnya. He graduated from the Institute of Contemporary Art ICA (Moscow, 2012) and and Higher Institute for Fine Arts HISK (Gent, 2017). Selected solo exhibitions include People of No Consequence, M HKA Museum of Contemporary Art Antwerp (Antwerp, BE. 2016); Memory Belongs to the Stones, Zink Gallery (Berlin, DE. 2015); and Untitled (War), Vinzavod Center of Contemporary Art (Moscow, RU. 2011). He has also participated in numerous group exhibitions, notably Power Nap, Museum of Modern Art (Yerevan, AM. 2018); I Am a Native Foreigner, Stedelijk Museum (Amsterdam, NL. 2017); Uncertain States, Akademie der Künste (Berlin, DE. 2016); Lines of Tangency, MSK Museum of Fine Arts, Ghent (Ghent, BE. 2015).

 

Anna Smolak is an independent curator based in Krakow, Poland. She studied History of Art at Jagiellonian University, Krakow, and Cultural Diplomacy at Collegium Civitas, Warsaw. Her research engages with contemporary institutional critique and the examination of alternative modes of collaboration and organization. She has investigated the notion of locality, periphery and exclusion, with a particular focus on Eastern European and post-Soviet contexts.

INSTALLATION VIEWS